The National Problem of Attacks on Rural America


Tomorrows program will be focusing on the attacks on and dismantling of the small farm and ranch heritage that is the cornerstone of American exceptionalism.  Over the past 50 years we have seen a growing and intense attack on rural American lifestyles from Federal and State Land Agencies that seem more intent on promoting radical environmentalism than defending private property and rural lifestyles.

Our guest will be Pennsylvania farmer Bob Brace (Brace Farms)who has spent the past 30+ years in very costly litigation over a wetlands issue that should have never have become a problem.  He will be joined by property rights advocate and local government consultant, Jim Carlson ( Stillwater Technical Solutions),  and Science Editor/Writer for Range Magazine, Chance Gowan.

We have spent a great deal of airtime covering the Bundy trials, Hammond incarceration, Malheur Standoff and tragic ambush of Rancher Lavoy Finicum; distinctly Western ranching issues.  The purpose of tomorrow’s radio program is to show how the attacks on rural American and private property are a national problem, impacting farming and ranching operations from coast to coast and border to border.

Bureaucrats and administrative agencies nationwide have changed the rules and the culture of private property in ways that could not have been imagined a century ago.  Radical environmentalism and Non-Governmental Organizations/Foundations now control the agenda and represent an undue influence over the rule making and focus of Cabinet level agencies.  Congress has stood idly by while administrators make up 95% of all new laws without an oversight by elected officials.  This has led to the most egregious government over reach imaginable, and the courts have done little to support the rights of individuals by creating a virtual police state/rubber stamp judiciary.


Please read the Article about Bob Brace’s fight for his land:

Blood And Dirt: A Farmer’s 30-Year Fight With The Feds

 

 

 

Bob Brace with his sign

 

 

Mr. Carlson’s 27 year portfolio includes programs that affect federal administrative Jim Carlsonagencies; formation and execution of legislative strategies; technical, statutory, and historical research; environmental compliance; large-scale infrastructure project management; and, ground-up creation and management of 4 statewide associations. His ability to merge reconnaissance, technical analysis, political strategy and strategic directives into tactical, natural-resource policy initiatives that influence government decision-making is recognized by industry, legislative and political circles. Mr. Carlson’s career began in the electric utility industry where he gained a track record in project management, regulatory negotiations, water research, environmental policy, and participation in leadership circles, including the Steering Committee of the Utilities Solid Waste Activities Group (USWAG), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Mr. Carlson has been a central figure in the start-up of four statewide associations, two consulting firms, and he presently is working on what he hopes will be a framework for a national association of local governments that will engage federal agencies on natural-resource and administrative policy issues.

Chance Gowan is an aquatic biologist with the U.S. Forest Service in Idaho. He helps community-based collaborative groups to effectively participate in land management decisions.

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